The Taliban's War on Women

The Taliban's War on Women

Video of an Afghan woman being killed in front of cheering men shocked the world. Who was she? And how could it happen? For more on Yalda Hakim's report, go to the SBS Dateline website... http://bit.ly/QAH5Fx

AFGHANISTAN: GOVERNMENT CRACKS DOWN ON CRIME UPDATE

AFGHANISTAN: GOVERNMENT CRACKS DOWN ON CRIME UPDATE

English/Nat With food and medicine in short supply, Afghanistan's beleaguered government is cracking down hard on crime in a bid to maintain public order. Three people have just been publicly hanged in Kabul after being convicted by an Islamic court of murdering two shepherds and stealing a flock of sheep. It's believed to be the first government sanctioned hanging in the Afghan capital since 1992. Kabul is currently under siege from the Taliban militia -- strongly religious and accused of being backed by Pakistan -- who are preventing vital supplies such as food and medicine from entering the city. For nearly four years, since overthrowing the communists in 1992, Afghanistan has been rocked by bitter faction fighting that has destroyed much of the capital, Kabul. Kabul is currently under siege from Taliban forces who are preventing vital supplies such as food and medicine from entering the city. Every day the Taliban launch rocket attacks against the ravaged capital in a violent bid to unseat the government that they call un-Islamic. The government has little control over the country except in the capital and some major cities. People are taking drastic measures to survive. Three people have just been publicly hanged in Kabul after being convicted by an Islamic court of murdering two shepherds and stealing a flock of sheep. This is the first government hanging since 1992. The government is trying to crack down on increasing crime in Kabul bought on by the siege. Thousands of people gathered at the execution site to see the three men, an army commander, foot soldier and butcher, hanged by their necks. The U-N-H-C-R and other international aid organisations have been vainly trying to bring in supplies to the besieged capital. Kabul is largely isolated from the rest of Afghanistan, with key land routes routinely closed. Sometimes the only way to bring in food is by air. Tens of thousands of people rely entirely on food aid and much of the population is believed to be malnourished. SOUNDBITE: "So the idea was to select the most deprived families. So we were going district by district, following the administrative breakdown of Kabul, meeting the head of the police department and also the head of the administrative department in Kabul, and selecting in those districts, the small sub-districts that were suffering the most of the fighting, or suffered the most from the fights a few weeks ago." SUPER CAPTION: Mattieus Luft, French aid worker With the civil war showing no signs of ending the civilian population will prove to be the ultimate losers in the conflict that has claimed far too many lives. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/31780e1e370fab3f2fbcbbf8747477eb Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

The Observers: A young Afghan woman wrongly accused beaten to death

The Observers: A young Afghan woman wrongly accused beaten to death

Subscribe to France 24 now: http://f24.my/youtubeEN FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7 http://f24.my/YTliveEN People believed wrongly that a young women had burnt a copy of the Koran so they beat her to death Visit our website: http://www.france24.com Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.English Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/France24_en

Kabul women get an exciting new read

Kabul women get an exciting new read

1. Wide shots of Kabul street 2. Women in burqas walking down the street 3. Afghan woman getting a haircut at beauty salon 4. Pan photographs of women's hairstyles on the wall of salon 5. Woman in white burqa walking down the street 6. Printing press printing first edition of 'Roz' magazine (meaning 'Day' in English) 7. Various shots of first edition coming out of printing press 8. Various close-ups of cover page of magazine 9. Set-up shot of magazine's editor, Lailoma Ahmadi 10. SOUNDBITE: (Dari) Lailoma Ahmadi, Editor, 'Roz' "The best topic is the role of Afghan women in the construction of Afghanistan. Our country is ruined. Reconstruction has started. And because of that we want to forge the role of women in reconstruction. We have reportage from Kabul City and we are collecting information about women's problems here. These problems we make known to the authorities and we demand that they address them." 11. Mid shot female 'Roz' journalists 12. Various of pages of the magazine 13. SOUNDBITE: (Dari) Lailoma Ahmadi, Editor, 'Roz' "Women didn't have rights during the Taliban period. Now Afghan women have re-discovered their freedom and their rights. We can show these new activities through this magazine." 14. 'Roz' journalists seated 15. Articles from magazine 16. SOUNDBITE: (Dari) Lailoma Ahmadi, Editor, 'Roz' "During the Taliban rule, women did not have a role in the community. We couldn't work outside the house, and who knows what kind of punishment the Taliban would have inflicted on us had we done something like publishing a women's magazine. They probably would have thrown us in jail." 17. Mid shot 'Roz' journalists STORYLINE: With the Taliban gone, women in Afghanistan's capital Kabul are freer than they have been for years. In response to the changing times, a new magazine is soon hitting the newsstands on the city's streets. It offers a rare look at what's on Afghan women's minds and an even rarer view behind the body-shrouding burqas that most women still wear in public. The new magazine is called "Roz", "The Day" and is funded by the French magazine Elle. Like "Elle", the magazine covers not only fashion but also other topics such as society, law, cooking. Its staff says they hope the magazine will help women reclaim lives smashed during five years of Taliban rule, when women were barred from school and work and could not go out without a male relative and an all-enveloping burqa. Editor Lailoma Ahmadi spent 18 years as a newscaster at Afghan radio before the Taliban forced her to quit. Now she's back working in the media and full of new ideas. The new magazine's first cover is a color headshot of a young Afghan woman wearing a headscarf. "Roz" will be the first major new Afghan publication for women. The 36-page publication will employ 16 journalists, all but two of them women. The magazine will have articles in the two main Afghan languages, Dari and Pashtu, as well as in French and English. Elle's parent company, the Hachette Group, has donated three computers, a digital camera and other materials, and will pay salaries and production costs. Staff working on the magazine say the group has laid out about US dollars 6,500 in startup costs and expects to spend about US dollars 5-thousand more on each issue. The magazine's first issue was sent to the presses on Monday. Ahmadi said there will be 1,500 copies in the initial run and that most will be distributed in the capital, Kabul. The first issue will be free; later issues will cost about 15 cents each. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1f087d9df727cdfe6d621d92ff81a72c Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

Life under Taliban in Afghanistan - BBC News

Life under Taliban in Afghanistan - BBC News

The BBC has been given rare access to see life under the Afghan Taliban in Helmand province. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog World In Pictures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS3XGZxi7cBX37n4R0UGJN-TLiQOm7ZTP Big Hitters https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS3XGZxi7cBUME-LUrFkDwFmiEc3jwMXP Just Good News https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS3XGZxi7cBUsYo_P26cjihXLN-k3w246

Film tells story of girl's life under the Taliban

Film tells story of girl's life under the Taliban

1. Various scenes from a female prison, from the film "Rainbow" 2. "Rainbow" director Siddik Barmak directing the cast 3. Close up character wearing burqa 4. Various shots of crew filming scenes for film 5. Camera dolly 6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Siddik Barmak, Filmmaker/Head of Afghan Films: "For my society, for my country it is very important after five years of Taliban rule to have the first standard (proper) film. It is not just for Afghans; it is for the people in the world we want to show what five years of suffering in Afghanistan was like, what was the tragedy, what was behind those people who banned everything, who were against humanity, who were against music and everything. But also to show what was the reaction of ordinary people, what was a reaction of that little girl." 7. Barmak helps his main character (little girl) to put on the burqa for the prison scene 8. Child's feet skipping 9. "Rainbow"'s main character dressed as a boy skipping 10. SOUNDBITE: (English) Siddik Barmak, Filmmaker/Head of Afghan Film: "They were enemy to everything - to arts, to human right - especially the film industry. It was the first to be subjected to banning. They closed everything - like movies and they burned films and pictures." 11. Yard where rolls of film partially destroyed by Taliban are dumped 12. Man sifting through the pile of burned film 13. Two Afghan film employees showing the fake wall they built to hide the entrance to the film storage room 14. Various of secret film storage room where rolls of films were kept safe in Taliban time 15. Mid shot man looking through roll of film STORYLINE: These are scenes from the new Afghan film "Rainbow", which chronicles the life of a young girl and her survival under the Taliban. They depict what for many women here then was the harsh reality of daily life. The film's director Siddik Barmak found his lead actor in the streets of capital Kabul. 13 year old Marina was begging in front of Kabul Film Studios when Barmak came across her. After searching for the right person for nearly three weeks, he said he looked into her eyes and knew she would be the vehicle for his new project. He had already considered some 3600 girls for the part. Marina's punishment in the film mirrors that of many young women during the Taliban reign. Her only crime was the desire to study in school - a right denied to women under Taliban. She decides to change her hairstyle and clothes and go to a boys' school but gets caught - and ends up in a terrible Taliban prison Filming began a few months ago and Barmak expects it will be finished by the beginning of 2003. He hopes to edit it by February and then offer it to international film festivals. Co-producing "Rainbow" is Mohsen Makhmalbaf - one of Iran's foremost directors and the man who made the film Kandahar. The Taliban's conquest of Kabul was catastrophic for the Afghan film industry. They burned thousands of rolls of film - burning two the first day they entered Kabul as a symbolic gesture. Barmak himself was safely out of the country but his colleagues at Afghan Films went to elaborate means to hide the nation's film archives from the Taliban. They went so far as to build a fake wall and store thousands of reels behind it. The Taliban never found the cache. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/78dd9de75743ff7570bada416f5d1fef Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

AFGHANISTAN: KABUL: TALIBAN ISLAMIC REBELS SEIZE CONTROL OF CAPITAL

AFGHANISTAN: KABUL: TALIBAN ISLAMIC REBELS SEIZE CONTROL OF CAPITAL

English/Nat Rebel Taliban Islamic rebels overran the defenses of Kabul on Friday, seizing control of the Afghan capital and hanging the former president Najibullah from a lamp post. The whereabouts of Baharunuddin Rabbani, the current president's and that of his top commander, Ahmed Shah Masood, were not immediately known. Taliban rebels said the government was no longer in power. After entering the capital with little resistance from government troops, the Taliban took over Kabul Radio and announced that Rabbani's coalition government, comprised of five rebel factions, was over. The rebels have vowed to bring peace along with strict Islamic rule to all of Afghanistan. If they can, they will be among the few to succeed in that country's violent history. With the ousting of President Burhanuddin Rabbani, the Taliban leadership is just the latest group to hold power in Kabul. The president's whereabouts and that of his top commander, Ahmed Shah Masood, were not immediately known. Most officers had fled during the night, as thousands of civilians and foreign aid workers evacuated the city. In New York on Wednesday, the Afghan Ambassador to the U-N accused Pakistan of actively supporting the Taliban rebels. SOUNDBITE: "Recently we have obtained hard evidences of the Pakistani militia's involvement alongside with the Taliban. They have committed serious incursions inside the Afghan territory, and they have enabled the Taliban to move towards the capital, bringing the situation to a very serious situation." SUPER CAPTION: Dr Ravan A. G. Farhadi, Afghan UN Ambassador The group began as a movement of former Islamic seminary students who disagreed with the practices of the various existing factions. In areas they previously captured, they enforced strict Islamic codes, closing girls schools, restricting the movement of women unaccompanied by men and imposing harsh criminal punishment of execution and amputations. Pakistan denies any involvement with the rebel group. SOUNDBITE: The government of Pakistan has already denied it, it has denied it officially, it has denied it categorically. In any case, the events in Afghanistan as they appear to be unfolding do not appear to be on the basis of any significant fighting. What appears to be happening is that the Taliban are advancing first into Jalabad, then into Sarobi and then beyond on the basis, essential of what appears to be either defections, or desertions. ." SUPER CAPTION: Ahmad Kamal, Pakistan Ambassador to U-N Kabul residents are reported to have cheered at the sight of the dead former president Najibullah. They were apparently hopeful the Taliban victory would end four years of factional wars and rocketing of the Afghan capital that killed as many as 30-thousand residents and levelled huge swathes of the city. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/ebbcd26286a2c43876a9efc704dfe262 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

AFGHANISTAN: KABUL: TALIBAN FORCES CONTINUE TO GAIN GROUND

AFGHANISTAN: KABUL: TALIBAN FORCES CONTINUE TO GAIN GROUND

Farsi/Nat Taliban forces continue to gain ground in northern Afghanistan, pushing back former government troops in an attempt to size control of the rest of the country. Just days after capturing the capital, Kabul, the Taliban, a religious army of Muslim fundamentalists, is enforcing an ultra-strict brand of Islamic law in the newly-conquered city. They have decreed that women stop working, closed down the television station and ordered bureaucrats and teachers to grow beards. APTV reports from the Afghan capital where the new government is starting to rule with an iron grip. The creation of Satan, according to these Taliban fighters. What remains of a rock music cassette discovered in a house in Kabul just days after the religious army of Islamic students took control of the capital. Their presence here is unmistakable. Gangs of Taliban fighters cruise the streets, just the latest in a long list of the city's conquerors who have followed in the footsteps of Alexander the Great. Yet in the past, there can hardly have been any as fanatical as Kabul's new masters. Bred on ultra-extreme Islamic rhetoric, they are determined to enforce a brand of Islamic law so radical it allows no compromise, no moderation. They are a highly-motivated movement - their objectives are clear and to the point. SOUNDBITE: (Farsi) "Our main aim is to establish (Sharia) Islamic law. That is the only thing and the best thing for the country. Nothing else matters. Once we have established it here then we will create an Islamic federation with other countries." SUPER CAPTION: Voxpop, Taliban Masood Quick to form an Islamic council since their takeover, the Taliban have already banned women from working. Those who do not cover themselves from head to toe face severe punishment. On Sunday two women were badly beaten in a Kabul bazaar - their crime: wearing garments that covered all but their eyes. Across the city, schools remain closed as the curriculums are reviewed. Male teachers as well as bureaucrats have been ordered to grow beards, and watching television has been banned. So far, apart from Pakistan, the international community has failed to recognise the new government. In Kabul, a sense of unease prevails, as Taliban fighters are reported to be advancing north towards the retreating forces of the deposed President Burhanuddin Rabbani. The Taliban, who promise to cut off the hands of anyone caught thieving, have themselves looted cars and sized houses, forcing their inhabitants onto the streets. Tens of thousands have fled the city, many of them from minority ethnic groups, traditional enemies of the majority Pushtuns who make up the Taliban movement. Many more fear they will be persecuted should they stay. One thing is for sure, with the former government forces on the run, the Taliban will be difficult to dislodge from Kabul. And as the Taliban move north, they may soon control the entire country. With the Taliban in control, Kabul has a last won a respite from the bombardments that pounded this city during the civil war since 1992. 30-thousand people have died and tens of thousands more have been injured. And there seems little doubt that many here have welcomed an end to the fighting by factions in and around the city. Meanwhile the United States is planning to send a diplomat to Afghanistan in the coming days to raise a series of issues with the new government, including the possibility of re-opening the U-S embassy. But as the Taliban begin to enforce their fanatical ways, the educated classes and minority ethnic groups are looking for somewhere to flee. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1a86597c4e6a82ede5eec73c640e55f8 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

Kabul under siege | Afghanistan | Taliban | This Week | 1989

Kabul under siege | Afghanistan | Taliban | This Week | 1989

Viewer Discretion is advised. When the Soviet troops pulled out of Afghanistan in February, Western Diplomat and government predicted that the Afghan Government would collapse in a matter of weeks if not days. Peter Gill Reports from the embattled city. months First shown: 18/05/1989 If you would like to license a clip from this video please e mail: archive@fremantlemedia.com Quote: VT45547

In Afghanistan, Desperate Parents Sell Their Children and the Taliban Rules Supreme

In Afghanistan, Desperate Parents Sell Their Children and the Taliban Rules Supreme

A Decaying State (2009): An exclusive report which uncovers the state of anarchy and lawlessness prevailing across Afghanistan today. For similar stories, see: The Afghan Warlord Taking the Fight to the Taliban https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDkKfUKdY2E Ordinary Pakistanis Live Under the Thumb of the Taliban https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDaAsRzFsJQ Afghan Election Chaos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKwj2-OcflY Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/film/4626 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures Children for sale, the Taliban’'s parallel government and a booming kidnapping business: welcome to Afghanistan. In a refugee camp in the North of Afghanistan, a father sells his son to survive. “"Say your goodbyes now, it'’s time to go”," says a wealthy woman from Kabul, handing over $1,500. “"I sold a piece of my heart to stop my four other children dying”," sobs the father. "“People are going to Iran and Pakistan, or joining the Taliban, because they’'re poor and don’'t have a future”," says one impoverished farmer. And where there’'s poverty, the Taliban are never far away. “"I’'m serving my people in the name of God" claims Mulla Meshe, a Taliban commander. The government is not helping”. A mile-long queue of people wait outside his office near the refugee camp and a few feet away another Taliban official takes payment for electricity stolen from the government. In Kabul, lawlessness takes a different form. "“He said “when we cut off your finger and send it to your family, we’'ll find your money," remembers Homuna Sefe, showing us the well he was held hostage in for 3 weeks. "“We are not dealing with poor people”," says Matim Khan, parading his hostage, an Afghan teenager, in front of the cameras. “"We'’ll take his eyes out, or sell him to the Taliban”." Criminal gangs are united with the Taliban and ordinary Afghans have lost all faith in a government, which sees them struggling to survive. Mehran Bozorgnia – Ref. 4626 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.

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