Europe after the Rain: Dadaism and Surrealism (full movie)

Europe after the Rain: Dadaism and Surrealism (full movie)

After the Rain: Dadaism and Surrealism (full movie)

The Case for Surrealism | The Art Assignment | PBS Digital Studios

The Case for Surrealism | The Art Assignment | PBS Digital Studios

"Surrealism" has become shorthand for the bizarre, the irrational, the hallucinatory. But what IS it? Or what WAS it? Today we delve into the history of Surrealism, as it formed in post-World War I Europe and as it has infiltrated our wider culture up to today. Here's our case for what Surrealism is, and why you should care about it. Written by Joanna Fiduccia Subscribe for new episodes of The Art Assignment every Thursday! -- Follow us elsewhere for the full Art Assignment experience: Tumblr: http://theartassignment.com Response Tumblr: http://all.theartassignment.com Twitter: http://twitter.com/artassignment Instagram: http://instagram.com/theartassignment/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/theartassignment and don't forget Reddit!: http://www.reddit.com/r/TheArtAssignment

Exploring Surrealism with Peter Capaldi | Unlock Art

Exploring Surrealism with Peter Capaldi | Unlock Art

Need some help getting to grips with Surrealism? The Doctor will see you now. Peter Capaldi, a former art student, and the latest actor to play Doctor Who, settles down on Freud's couch to deliver his wry take on the Surrealist movement.    'Unlock Art' is Tate's new short film series, offering a witty inside track on the world of art.  Doctor Who actor Peter Capaldi joins forces with rock duo The Kills, comedian Frank Skinner, Girls star Jemima Kirke and other celebrity art fans to introduce some of the big ideas that have shaped art history. A new film is released each month, with topics ranging from the history of the nude and the nature of the art market, to Pop art.   Unlock Art is a collaboration between Tate and Le Méridien Hotels & Resorts. Le Méridien Unlock Artmicrosite: http://www.lemeridien.com/filmseries   As an ongoing supporter of Tate's work, Le Méridien also sponsors the Outset/Frieze Art Fair Fund to benefit the Tate collection, which enables Tate to buy work by emerging artists at Frieze London.   Unlock Art supported by Le Méridien.

The BEST Surrealists~Kay Sage

The BEST Surrealists~Kay  Sage

The BEST Surrealists~Kay Sage Artworks A Little Later (1938) My Room Has Two Doors (1939) This Morning (painting)|This Morning (1939) Lost Record (1940) Danger, Construction Ahead (1940) White Silence (1941) Margin of Silence (1942) The Fourteen Daggers (1942) At The Appointed Time (1942) The Hidden Letter (1943) From Another Approach (1944) I Saw Three Cities (1944) In the 3rd Sleep (1944) The Upper Side of the Sky (1944) All Soundings Are Referred to High Water (1947) Ring of Iron, Ring of Wool (1947) The Unicorns Came Down From the Sea (1947) The Instant (1949) The Morning Myth (1950) Small Portrait (1950) Men Working (1951) Tomorrow for Example (1951) Unusual Thursday (1951) On the Contrary (1952) Third Paragraph (1953) No Passing (1954) Hyphen (1954) A Bird in the Room (1955) Tomorrow is Never (1955) Le Passage (1956) The Answer Is No (1958)

Exploring the surrealists' techniques and materials

Exploring the surrealists' techniques and materials

(24 Mar 2016) LEAD IN: A collection of works from the surrealist Joan Miro has opened in Milan, revealing how he changed techniques and the materials he worked with throughout his life. 'Joan Miro. The Force of Matter,' features paintings and sculptures, representing Miro's interpretation of the world, influenced by surrealists and poets of the 1920s and 1930s. STORY-LINE: Joan Miro had an exceptional ability to continuously innovate, shifting techniques and experimenting with new materials throughout his working life. The Catalan artist is considered one of the greatest surrealists. Joan Punyet Miro, the artist's grandson, says Miro was a man in contact with his materials. "The pillars, to understand the evolution of Miro's iconography are; colour, shape and material. Miro was a magician of colour. He was able to use the most expressive colours you can imagine. And at the same time, what really matters to me is material because he was like an alchemist," he says. "So he was able to understand the magic of his support upon which he was going to lay all the colours, and then the magic of interpretation of dreams, and the magic of surrealistic poetry. So all the pillars really emphasise the magic of Miro's world in a very peculiar way here in Milan." The collection presented in Milan is made up of more than 100 pieces from 1931 to 1981, presented in chronological order. Most are from the Fundacio Joan Miro of Barcelona and from private collections, including Miro's own family members. It intends to shed light on the process Joan Miro went through to become one of the main protagonists of surrealism. The artist's grandson, Joan Punyet Miro, says Miro felt free of some of the limitations of the art world. "For me, the man behind the magic was quite spectacular because I could see that he was always travelling, mentally speaking he was flying up to the clouds and back to Earth. He was like a bird in a mystical, magical realm in which he was able to be in contact with heaven and earth, with life and death, with consciousness and sub consciousness. So Miro was like a magical creature able to really fly beneath the lines in between poetry and painting and get the most out of each realm." Visitors can see Miro's experimentations with the surrealism art movement and his evolution. Miro experimented with new symbols, techniques as well as materials throughout his career. The exhibit 'Joan Miro. The Force of Matter,' runs from March 25 – September 11 at the MUDEC museum in Milan. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/e9c84842bcc498ad0a85318f175f160a Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

What is Surrealism?

What is Surrealism?

An artistic and fun look into surrealism.

Surrealism and Dada Movement, Salvador Dali, Max Ernst, Joan Miro, 20th Century art.

Surrealism and Dada Movement, Salvador Dali, Max Ernst, Joan Miro, 20th Century art.

The Dada and Surrealist Movement. Dada began as an anti-art movement , a movement against the way art was appreciated by the civilized world. Surrealism was, above all a revolutionary movement. Through the use of unconventional techniques such as automatism and frottage, Surrealist artists attempted to tap into the dream-world of the subliminal mind The Dada and Surrealist revolt has helped to change modern consciousness. Subscribe - never miss a video! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_S8ZlDCRkMMgc7ciw8X-hg The 20th Century Time Machine takes you back in time to the most important historical events of the past century. Watch documentaries, discussions and real footage of major events that shaped the world we live in today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHAZA5h5cmo

Introduction to Surrealism

Introduction to Surrealism

Surrealism emerged in the early 1920s as an artistic embrace of the subconscious

Max Ernst_(1891-1976) German Painter Dadaist and Surrealist art movements

Max Ernst_(1891-1976) German Painter Dadaist and Surrealist art movements

Max Ernst (1891-1976) German Painter, Editor, Sculptor and collage Dadaist and Surrealist art movements Max Ernst, in full Maximilian Maria Ernst (born April 2, 1891, Brühl, Germany—died April 1, 1976, Paris, France) German painter and sculptor who was one of the leading advocates of irrationality in art and an originator of the Automatism movement of Surrealism. He became a naturalized citizen of both the United States (1948) and France (1958). Ernst’s early interests were psychiatry and philosophy, but he abandoned his studies at the University of Bonn for painting. After serving in the German army during World War I, Ernst was converted to Dada, a nihilistic art movement, and formed a group of Dada artists in Cologne. With the artist-poet Jean Arp, he edited journals and created a scandal by staging a Dada exhibit in a public restroom. More important, however, were his Dada collages and photomontages, such as Here Everything Is Still Floating (1920), a startlingly illogical composition made from cutout photographs of insects, fish, and anatomical drawings ingeniously arranged to suggest the multiple identity of the things depicted. In 1922 Ernst moved to Paris, where two years later he became a founding member of the Surrealists, a group of artists and writers whose work grew out of fantasies evoked from the unconscious. To stimulate the flow of imagery from his unconscious mind, Ernst began in 1925 to use the techniques of frottage (pencil rubbings of such things as wood grain, fabric, or leaves) and decalcomania (the technique of transferring paint from one surface to another by pressing the two surfaces together). Contemplating the accidental patterns and textures resulting from these techniques, he allowed free association to suggest images he subsequently used in a series of drawings (Histoire naturelle, 1926) and in many paintings, such as The Great Forest (1927) and The Temptation of St. Anthony (1945). These vast swamplike landscapes stem ultimately from the tradition of nature mysticism of the German Romantics. In 1929 Ernst returned to collage and created The Woman with 100 Heads, his first “collage novel”—a sequence of illustrations assembled from 19th- and 20th-century reading material and a format which he is credited with having invented. Soon afterward he created the collage novels A Little Girl Dreams of Taking the Veil (1930) and A Week of Kindness (1934). After 1934 Ernst’s activities centred increasingly on sculpture, using improvised techniques in this medium just as he had in painting. Oedipus II (1934), for example, was cast from a stack of precariously balanced wooden pails to form a belligerent-looking phallic image. At the outbreak of World War II, Ernst moved to the United States, where he joined his third wife, the collector and gallery owner Peggy Guggenheim (divorced 1943), and his son, the American painter Jimmy Ernst. While living on Long Island, New York, and after 1946 in Sedona, Arizona (with his fourth wife, the American painter Dorothea Tanning), he concentrated on such sculptures as The King Playing with the Queen (1944), which shows African influence. After his return to France in 1953, his work became less experimental: he spent much time perfecting his modeling technique in traditional sculptural materials.

French Surrealism - A Revolution of the Mind

French Surrealism - A Revolution of the Mind

French Surrealism is probably best known for its paintings–images of floppy watches or men in bowler hats and topcoats falling from the sky. But just as central to the movement was the poetry produced from the beginning by André Breton, Robert Desnos, Benjamin Péret, Louis Aragon, René Char, and a host of others. We will read samples of that poetry in translation and offer historical asides to provide context for activities that ranged from the mid-twenties to the late sixties.​ Participants: Mary Ann Caws Distinguished Professor of English, French, and Comparative Literature at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York Anne-Marie Levine Poet and Visual Artist Mark Polizzotti Author, Director of the Publications Program at The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bill Zavatsky Poet

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