Suturing a Wound | Suturing Techniques

Suturing a Wound | Suturing Techniques

Suturing a Wound | Suturing Techniques Principles - Medical Videos Learn About Suturing Methods at Home and Procedures of Incised and Lacerated Wounds and skin. Watch and download this video to improve your suturing skills. These techniques can also be used in dentistry, general surgery, orthopedics and obstetrics & gynecology. These are all basic suturing techniques which can also be used in plastic surgery. How to suture a wound & laceration in surgery.

Suture - Basic Technique 1

Suture - Basic Technique 1

Demonstration of basic good suture technique and habits. This is an instructional video to teach emergency medical care of basic suture technique when performing suturing of lacerations.

Medical Assistant Training: Prepare for Suture Removal

Medical Assistant Training: Prepare for Suture Removal

Medical training simulations at www.simtics.com This video excerpt is from the module which covers how to remove sutures (how to remove stitches). It is part of our Medical Assisting e-Learning suite. Each module covers a different MA procedure and provides a simulation to help you learn and practice the procedure, plus explanatory text, anatomy model, video and quizzes. A personal logbook tracks your learning time and scores. Personal subscriptions to the SIMTICS eLearning modules available at www.simtics.com/MedicalAssistant. YouTube users benefit from 30% discount - use coupon code YOUTUBE30 during sign-up. The learning objectives for this e-Learning module are as follows: - Describe pre-procedure considerations for suture removal. - Describe and demonstrate the preparation for suture removal. - Describe and demonstrate sterile technique. - Describe different suture types and the appropriate situations for their use. - Describe and demonstrate suture removal. - Describe wound healing. - Describe and demonstrate wound care. - Describe and demonstrate correct post-procedure considerations. - Define and demonstrate correct recording and reporting procedures. - Define and use related medical terminology. - Understand and apply Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines. - Explain the Patient Privacy Rule (HIPAA), Patient Safety Act, and Patients' Bill of Rights. www.simtics.com/Medical Assistant

When a Cut Finger Is More Serious Than It Might Seem

When a Cut Finger Is More Serious Than It Might Seem

I'm Alex Villarreal with the VOA Special English Health Report, from http://voaspecialenglish.com | http://facebook.com/voalearningenglish Hospital emergency rooms treat injured fingers all the time. Without treatment, a bad cut can lead to permanent damage. But how should a person know when a bleeding cut is serious enough to require medical attention? We asked Dr. Martin Brown, chairman of the department of emergency medicine at Inova Alexandria Hospital in Virginia. First, the medical term for a cut or tear in the skin is a laceration. Dr. Brown says the length is usually not as important as the depth. He says a long cut on a finger can likely be treated without a visit to a doctor if the wound is not very deep. He said a short but deep laceration where a tendon, nerve or blood vessel has been damaged may need professional attention. Some injuries -- like a fingertip that gets cut off -- might require surgery to repair.How a wound bleeds can be a sign of how serious it is. Minor cuts usually produce what is known as venous bleeding. This means the blood flows steadily from the injury. The bleeding will often stop when pressure is put on the wound. Dr. Brown says in most cases holding direct pressure with clean gauze or a cloth for four to five minutes should stop the bleeding. With a cut finger, holding the hand above the heart can reduce the loss of blood.But if a cut appears to be pumping blood out with some force, this may be a sign of arterial bleeding. This kind of injury should be treated by a medical professional as soon as possible. Even a cut that does not require medical attention must be kept clean to prevent infection. Small cuts should be cleaned gently with clean water. Use a washcloth to clean the area if the wound is dirty. Dr. Brown says cuts should be covered with a clean, dry bandage. Bacteria and other microorganisms can enter the body through a cut in the skin. One kind of infection that can result is tetanus. The first signs of this disease include difficulty opening the mouth -- often called lockjaw -- and difficulty swallowing. Tetanus can be deadly. But children and adults can be protected against tetanus with vaccinations. Adults should be vaccinated against tetanus every ten years. Next week, learn more about treating serious cuts. For VOA Special English I'm Alex Villarreal. You can comment on this program at voaspecialenglish.com. And you can find us on Facebook and Twitter at VOA Learning English. (Adapted from a radio program broadcast 26Jan2011)

Circumcision | Nucleus Health

Circumcision | Nucleus Health

To license this video for patient education or content marketing, visit: http://www.nucleushealth.com/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=video-description&utm_campaign=circumcision-040714 This video, created by Nucleus Medical Media, shows the anatomy related to circumcision and the key steps of the procedure. ANH13092

Medical Assistant Training Prepare for Minor Surgical Procedures

Medical Assistant Training Prepare for Minor Surgical Procedures

Describe the pre-procedure considerations for Prepare for Minor Surgical Procedures. Describe and demonstrate the process for opening a sterile pack and creating a sterile field. Describe and demonstrate the process for transferring sterile instruments. Describe and demonstrate the process for pouring sterile solution onto a sterile field. Describe and demonstrate correct post-procedure considerations. Define and demonstrate correct recording and reporting procedures. Define and use related medical terminology. Understand and apply Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines. Explain the Patient Privacy Rule (HIPAA), Patient Safety Act, and Patients' Bill of Rights. www.simtics.com

The Embalming Process.mp4

The Embalming Process.mp4

At Benson Family Funeral Home of Chicago, we are proud to offer a wide selection of services: Traditional Funeral, Graveside, Memorial, Cremation, Shipping, and Pre-need. For further information, contact: Benson Family Funeral Home of Chicago at 773-478-5800.

How Is An Autopsy Performed?

How Is An Autopsy Performed?

When you need someone to exam a corpse to determine a cause of death, how do they conduct the autopsy? Learn more at HowStuffWorks.com: http://science.howstuffworks.com/auto... Share on Facebook: https://goo.gl/06nKlf Share on Twitter: https://goo.gl/EJ6Aed Subscribe: http://goo.gl/ZYI7Gt Visit our site: http://www.brainstuffshow.com How does an autopsy work? First of all, a word of warning for our viewers. If you're squeamish, you might want to watch a less-gross episode of BrainStuff. Like "Why is bird poop white? Or "How do bed bugs work?" Okay. Ready? Let’s clarify that an autopsy is a medical examination of a dead body to determine the cause of death. There’s two types: forensic and clinical. Clinical ones are performed for research, medical training, or at the request of the deceased’s family. And forensic autopsies are the ones you’re used to seeing on TV, like when Agent Scully carves into a corpse because the truth is in there. This is often for legal reasons, potentially as evidence in criminal or civil court cases. While the general procedure is similar, for our purposes, let’s stick to forensic autopsies. Why? 'Cause I ain’t going out like a punk! All legally investigated deaths fall into 5 categories: natural, accident, homicide, suicide and undetermined. Yeah, that last one may seem a little wishy-washy, but sometimes the answers aren’t that clear for the attending medical examiner or coroner. And this is an important distinction. Forensic pathologists are physicians, trained to perform autopsies. In some counties they use “coroners” instead. And a coroner doesn’t necessarily have medical training. Instead, they’re elected to their position. They can be anyone: farmers, snake handlers, even YouTube hosts… But if a non-medical coroner ever needs assistance, the state usually provides them with a medical examiner. When that examiner finally gets ahold of your cold body, here’s what they’ll do to it. First they gather information on you, your death and your medical records. Then they record an external exam of your appearance. They start by photographing you inside a body bag, noting your clothing and its position before stripping you naked. They try to establish your identity, noting ethnicity, gender, age, and hair and eye color. Then they collect samples of hair, fingernails and any foreign objects found on your surface. Once the external exam is done, they clean your body, weigh it and measure it. On the table they place a rubber body block under your back to make your chest protrude forward so the arms and neck fall back. This makes it easier... for the cutting! For a complete internal exam they start with the chest, making a Y-shaped incision. Following this, they peel back your skin, muscle and soft tissue with a scalpel, pull the chest flap over your face and expose your ribcage and neck muscles. Your ribcage is then removed, followed by your larynx, esophagus, arteries and ligaments. By severing a few attachments to your spinal cord, bladder, and rectum, the examiner can remove the rest of your organs as an entire set. Your organs are each examined and weighed, with sample slices taken of their tissue. If necessary, these organs are stored in formalin. Depending on how you died, they probably won’t cut open your arms, hands, legs or face. But don’t think your head is off the hook just yet. If they need a peek inside your noggin, the examiner will move the rubber block under your neck like a pillow. Then they make a cut from behind one ear, across your forehead, over to the other ear and around the back. Then out comes the electric saw to pop the top of your skull off like a cap and expose your brain. This is severed from your spinal cord and then lifted out, Frankenstein style. Just like your other organs, it’s weighed and examined. What happens to all of those organs, sitting outside of your body anyway? Well, depending on the style of funeral, they’re either put back in or incinerated. Either way, the butterflied chest flaps are closed, the skull cap is placed back on your head and everything is sewn up nice and tidy with a baseball stitch. Though even after your body goes off to the funeral home, a pathologist’s work is never done. It takes days to get tissue and blood samples tested and at least two weeks for brain samples. Then it takes hours more to write up a detailed report for the official record. Keep in mind that this is a brief overview of the autopsy process. We didn’t even get into examining wounds, determining the time of death, or what tools of the trade are used to crack you open. SOURCES: http://science.howstuffworks.com/auto... http://www.livescience.com/32789-fore... Sedaris, D. (1998). Working stiffs. Esquire, 129(4), 114. Odyssey. Sep2008, Vol. 17 Issue 7, p18-21. 4p. 3 Color Photographs, 1 Graph. What does the autopsy show? Kowalski, Kathiann M.

Simple Interrupted Suture with Instrument Tie

Simple Interrupted Suture with Instrument Tie

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

Each day millions of people receive some type of wound therapy after a surgery or an injury. To help with that recovery, health experts at Lee Memorial Health System are using a popular device that helps patients recover faster and safer. It’s called a negative pressure wound therapy. It works much like a vacuum seal. After foam is placed inside the wound, a vacuum assisted closure is placed on top. Once the machine is turned on, the wound is slowly pulled together. “It helps bring the wound edges together. It helps remove the drainage. It controls any swelling inside the wound, stimulates the formation of granulation tissue which speeds up the entire wound healing process” said Marcus Scharre, a wound care supervisor with Lee Memorial Health System. The device is used on more than six million wounds nationwide. “Larger wounds can take a significant time to heal, so this speeds it up big time” said Scharre. Negative wound pressure therapy is used on wounds that are too large or too deep for stitches or staples. Typically, patients wear the device for six to eight weeks. “They’re used on a lot of different wounds” said Scharre. “Acute wounds, chronic wounds, surgical incisions, pressure ulcers, things like that.” Before negative wound pressure therapy, health experts commonly used a system called wet to dry where they changed the patient’s dressing every day. With negative pressure wound therapy, the dressing is only changed three times a week. When a patient leaves the hospital, they transition to a smaller, more portable wound vac. This allows patients to leave the hospital sooner while still receiving the treatment they need. The negative pressure wound therapy lowers the risk for infection by offering a quicker and safer wound closure. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org

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