KMT32B Magneto Resistive Sensor

KMT32B Magneto Resistive Sensor

http://www.digikey.com/ptm - This tutorial, provided by Measurement Specialties, Inc./Schaevitz, presents the features and benefits of the KMT32B magneto resistive sensor along with an overview of device operation and several applications ideally suited to use this device.

Magnetostrictive level transmitter

Magnetostrictive level transmitter

This video shows how an MTS magnetostrictive level transmitter works, generating a variable (analog) output signal as the float changes position.

Magnetstrictive measuring principle - MTS

Magnetstrictive measuring principle - MTS

All MTS linear, absolute position sensors and liquid level gauges are based on the magnetostrictive technology. Inside the sensor, a torsional strain pulse is induced in a specially designed magnetostrictive waveguide by the momentary interaction of two magnetic fields. One field comes from a moving magnet, which passes along the outside of the transducer tube, and the other field is generated from a current pulse which is applied to the waveguide. The interaction between these two magnetic fields produces a strain pulse which travels at sonic speed along the sensor waveguide, until the pulse is detected at the head of the transducer. The position of the moving magnet is precisely determined by measuring the elapsed time between the application of the current pulse and the arrival of the strain pulse. As a result, accurate non contact position measurement with high repeatability and linearity is achieved with no wear to any of the sensor elements. MTS Temposonics sensors are distributed in Belgium & Luxemburg by Multiprox http://www.multiprox.be/nl/products_magnetostrictive_measuring_principle.htm

Magneto Resistive John Grischow

Magneto Resistive   John Grischow

Learn the operation and diagnosis of a magneto resistive wheel speed sensor

Linear Position Sensors

Linear Position Sensors

Turck's Inductive Linear Position Sensors can replace magnetorestrictive and potentiometric sensors with added benefits and more accuracy. To view the press release, please visit: http://pdb2.turck.de/us/DE/groups/0000000000012d3100030023 Video Transcription: "Linear displacement sensors have been in use for years, controlling and monitoring motion and position applications using potentiometric and magnetorestrictive technology for feedback. A new technology has begun to emerge in this market: linear inductive measurement. One linear inductive measurement technology uses the RLC (resistance, inductance, capacitance) principle to give more accurate and faster position feedback than ever before. This RL circuitry makes use of emitter and receiver coils on our printed circuit board. The position element contains an inductor and a capacitor. First, the emitter coils are excited with a high frequency AC field, which in turn charges the position element. The position element then resonates the charge into the receiver coils of the sensor. In simplest terms, think of the position element as a mirror that reflects energy back to the coils to indicate position. These signals are then internally processed to output the position of the target. Utilizing this inductive RLC circuit allows for faster and more accurate readings over many common output types, such as 0 to 10 volts, 4 to 20 milliamps, SSI, or IO-Link, as well as smaller overall packages."

Inductive Linear Position Sensor

Inductive Linear Position Sensor

Inductive linear position sensors can replace magnetorestrictive and potentiometric sensors with added benefits and more accuracy.

Introduction to Sensors (Full Lecture)

Introduction to Sensors (Full Lecture)

In this lesson we'll take a brief introductory look at sensors or transducers. We'll examine various methods of transduction for pressure, rotational speed, fluid velocity, flow rate, position (linear variable differential transformers (LVDT) and magnetorestrictive wave guides), level, vibration, and temperature. Additionally, we'll discuss transfer functions and the process of adjusting the zero and span of a particular sensor. Finally, we'll examine how sensors are employed in closed loop controllers and how closed loop controllers can automatically correct any errors and compensate for disturbances. (Full Lecture)

Magnetoresistance

Magnetoresistance

Magnetoresistance Magnetoresistance is the property of a material to change the value of its electrical resistance when an external magnetic field is applied to it.There is a variety of effects that can be called magnetoresistance, some of them occurring in bulk non-magnetic metals and semiconductors (e.g. =======Image-Copyright-Info======== License: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0) LicenseLink: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 Author-Info: Brews_ohare Image Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Corbino_disc.PNG =======Image-Copyright-Info======== -Video is targeted to blind users Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA image source in video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmF_u7OIU50

Gas Saving Devices Busted 1

Gas Saving Devices Busted 1

In MythBusters : Adam & Jamie Look into these InterNut Devices which claim Huge Amount of Gas Saving. Some even Claims 300 MPG!

What is MAGNETOSTRICTION? What does MAGNETOSTRICTION mean? MAGNETOSTRICTION meaning

What is MAGNETOSTRICTION? What does MAGNETOSTRICTION mean? MAGNETOSTRICTION meaning

What is MAGNETOSTRICTION? What does MAGNETOSTRICTION mean? MAGNETOSTRICTION meaning - MAGNETOSTRICTION definition - MAGNETOSTRICTION explanation - MAGNETOSTRICTION pronunciation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Magnetostriction is a property of ferromagnetic materials that causes them to change their shape or dimensions during the process of magnetization. The variation of materials' magnetization due to the applied magnetic field changes the magnetostrictive strain until reaching its saturation value, ?. The effect was first identified in 1842 by James Joule when observing a sample of iron. This effect causes energy loss due to frictional heating in susceptible ferromagnetic cores. The effect is also responsible for the low-pitched humming sound that can be heard coming from transformers, caused by oscillating AC currents, which produce a changing magnetic field. Internally, ferromagnetic materials have a structure that is divided into domains, each of which is a region of uniform magnetic polarization. When a magnetic field is applied, the boundaries between the domains shift and the domains rotate; both of these effects cause a change in the material's dimensions. The reason that a change in the magnetic domains of a material results in a change in the materials dimensions is a consequence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy, that it takes more energy to magnetize a crystalline material in one direction than another. If a magnetic field is applied to the material at an angle to an easy axis of magnetization the material will tend to rearrange its structure so that an easy axis is aligned with the field to minimize the free energy of the system. Since different crystal directions are associated with different lengths this effect induces a strain in the material. The reciprocal effect, the change of the magnetic susceptibility (response to an applied field) of a material when subjected to a mechanical stress, is called the Villari effect. Two other effects are thus related to magnetostriction: the Matteucci effect is the creation of a helical anisotropy of the susceptibility of a magnetostrictive material when subjected to a torque and the Wiedemann effect is the twisting of these materials when a helical magnetic field is applied to them. The Villari reversal is the change in sign of the magnetostriction of iron from positive to negative when exposed to magnetic fields of approximately 40,000 A/m. On magnetization, a magnetic material undergoes changes in volume which are small: of the order 10-6 Like flux density, the magnetostriction also exhibit hysteresis versus strength of magnetizing field. The shape of this hysteresis loop (called "butterfly loop") can be reproduced using the Jiles-Atherton model.

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