KMT32B Magneto Resistive Sensor

KMT32B Magneto Resistive Sensor

http://www.digikey.com/ptm - This tutorial, provided by Measurement Specialties, Inc./Schaevitz, presents the features and benefits of the KMT32B magneto resistive sensor along with an overview of device operation and several applications ideally suited to use this device.

Magnetstrictive measuring principle - MTS

Magnetstrictive measuring principle - MTS

All MTS linear, absolute position sensors and liquid level gauges are based on the magnetostrictive technology. Inside the sensor, a torsional strain pulse is induced in a specially designed magnetostrictive waveguide by the momentary interaction of two magnetic fields. One field comes from a moving magnet, which passes along the outside of the transducer tube, and the other field is generated from a current pulse which is applied to the waveguide. The interaction between these two magnetic fields produces a strain pulse which travels at sonic speed along the sensor waveguide, until the pulse is detected at the head of the transducer. The position of the moving magnet is precisely determined by measuring the elapsed time between the application of the current pulse and the arrival of the strain pulse. As a result, accurate non contact position measurement with high repeatability and linearity is achieved with no wear to any of the sensor elements. MTS Temposonics sensors are distributed in Belgium & Luxemburg by Multiprox http://www.multiprox.be/nl/products_magnetostrictive_measuring_principle.htm

Linear Position Sensors

Linear Position Sensors

Turck's Inductive Linear Position Sensors can replace magnetorestrictive and potentiometric sensors with added benefits and more accuracy. To view the press release, please visit: http://pdb2.turck.de/us/DE/groups/0000000000012d3100030023 Video Transcription: "Linear displacement sensors have been in use for years, controlling and monitoring motion and position applications using potentiometric and magnetorestrictive technology for feedback. A new technology has begun to emerge in this market: linear inductive measurement. One linear inductive measurement technology uses the RLC (resistance, inductance, capacitance) principle to give more accurate and faster position feedback than ever before. This RL circuitry makes use of emitter and receiver coils on our printed circuit board. The position element contains an inductor and a capacitor. First, the emitter coils are excited with a high frequency AC field, which in turn charges the position element. The position element then resonates the charge into the receiver coils of the sensor. In simplest terms, think of the position element as a mirror that reflects energy back to the coils to indicate position. These signals are then internally processed to output the position of the target. Utilizing this inductive RLC circuit allows for faster and more accurate readings over many common output types, such as 0 to 10 volts, 4 to 20 milliamps, SSI, or IO-Link, as well as smaller overall packages."

Magneto Resistive John Grischow

Magneto Resistive   John Grischow

Learn the operation and diagnosis of a magneto resistive wheel speed sensor

Magnetostrictive level transmitter

Magnetostrictive level transmitter

This video shows how an MTS magnetostrictive level transmitter works, generating a variable (analog) output signal as the float changes position.

Inductive Linear Position Sensor

Inductive Linear Position Sensor

Inductive linear position sensors can replace magnetorestrictive and potentiometric sensors with added benefits and more accuracy.

Introduction to Sensors (Full Lecture)

Introduction to Sensors (Full Lecture)

In this lesson we'll take a brief introductory look at sensors or transducers. We'll examine various methods of transduction for pressure, rotational speed, fluid velocity, flow rate, position (linear variable differential transformers (LVDT) and magnetorestrictive wave guides), level, vibration, and temperature. Additionally, we'll discuss transfer functions and the process of adjusting the zero and span of a particular sensor. Finally, we'll examine how sensors are employed in closed loop controllers and how closed loop controllers can automatically correct any errors and compensate for disturbances. (Full Lecture)

Throttle Position Sensor trouble code (P0123) caused by bent computer pin

Throttle Position Sensor trouble code (P0123) caused by bent computer pin

This was the first time I have ever seen 12v on a potentiometer style throttle position sensor. The spec for this sensor is around .5v at idle at around 4v at wide open throttle and this Jeep was fixed at 12v all the time. Scan data was misleading as the TPS data parameter showed a constant 5v regardless of throttle angle. Also when performing signal circuit integrity type testing, you will now understand why we use a resistor instead of a jumper wire. Engine Performance Diagnostics chapter 7 Symptoms - check engine light (P0123) - new throttle position sensor but keeps setting a code for the TPS - incorrect idle speed - hesitation on acceleration - stalling - no start with aftermarket computer chip removed Fix - repair bent computer pin Tests shown - how to test a throttle position sensor using scan data - how to test a TPS with a digital voltmeter - why scan data can be wrong and cause misdiagnosis - why you should use a resistor when performing a signal circuit integrity test - how to identify a short to power Tools used - scan tool - Lab Scope http://www.aeswave.com/cart.php?m=affiliate_go&affiliateID=60df1b5cf6e5582af6ff81c728f42d0d&go=http://www.aeswave.com/Lab-Scopes-c415/ Playlist - (Chapter 7) Potentiometer-position sensor tests TPS, EVP, APP, VAF etc https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAFYVCyenqcoHHRsegwvlLd0MYKazby99 Related videos - How to test throttle position sensor wiring with a resistor (any car) https://youtu.be/oZiroWQRgEc - How to test TPS wiring with a scan tool (any car) https://youtu.be/VhyNp7IsfQM - Scan tool data graph vs Lab Scope waveform (should I buy a scope?) https://youtu.be/nfnkT0Iki8s - 1996 Jeep No Start Case Study Part I https://youtu.be/a-d6-jrGidA - 1996 Jeep No Start Case Study Part II https://youtu.be/jLwNcgtv9z0 - 1996 Jeep No Start Case Study Part III https://youtu.be/dCZdv-FYwxw - What can cause an O2 sensor to read near 5 volts? (Chrysler bias voltage) https://youtu.be/v8XrM-7BuOg - System Too Rich P0172, P0175 from a blown O2 heater fuse (Jeep) https://youtu.be/SEuGtggZAvo For more information on this topic, I have written a “field manual” called Engine Performance Diagnostics which is available at www.scannerdanner.com as an eBook or paper book. Want even more diagnostic training? Whether you are a DIY trying to fix your own car, someone looking to become an auto technician, or a current auto technician that wants to get more into diagnostics, subscribe to ScannerDanner Premium https://www.scannerdanner.com/join-scannerdanner-premium.html There is a 14 day free trial. On ScannerDanner Premium I will bring you right into my classroom at Rosedale Technical College. You will find page for page lectures taken right from my book as well as exclusive classroom type case studies. What is so special about these classroom case studies? I pull live problem vehicles directly into my classroom and we troubleshoot them in real time, using and applying the theory and testing procedures we learn during the classroom lectures. There is no better on-line training of how to troubleshoot automotive electrical and electronics systems anywhere! Disclaimer: Due to factors beyond the control of ScannerDanner LLC, it cannot guarantee against unauthorized modifications of this information, or improper use of this information. ScannerDanner LLC assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. ScannerDanner LLC recommends safe practices when working with power tools, automotive lifts, lifting tools, jack stands, electrical equipment, blunt instruments, chemicals, lubricants, or any other tools or equipment seen or implied in this video. Due to factors beyond the control of ScannerDanner LLC, no information contained in this video shall create any express or implied warranty or guarantee of any particular result. Any injury, damage or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the user and not ScannerDanner LLC.

Speed & Position Sensors Trainer

Speed & Position Sensors Trainer

The EM-200-25 Speed and Position Sensors trainer is used to demonstrate the operation, diagnosis and testing of common types of analog and digital speed and position sensors as they operate on a real vehicle. The trainer includes Inductive, Hall-Effect and Magneto-resistive sensors. All sensors are driven by a variable speed electric motor to create different operating conditions. The trainer provides a safe and effective method of demonstrating the operating principles of different types of speed and position sensors used on today’s vehicles.

Introduction to Sensors (Part 1 of 2)

Introduction to Sensors (Part 1 of 2)

In this lesson we'll take a brief introductory look at sensors or transducers. We'll examine various methods of transduction for pressure, rotational speed, fluid velocity, flow rate, position (linear variable differential transformers (LVDT) and magnetorestrictive wave guides), level, vibration, and temperature. Additionally, we'll discuss transfer functions and the process of adjusting the zero and span of a particular sensor. Finally, we'll examine how sensors are employed in closed loop controllers and how closed loop controllers can automatically correct any errors and compensate for disturbances. (Part 1 of 2)

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