Cancer drug Keytruda price slashed treating the same disease which struck down Delta Goodrem

Cancer drug Keytruda price slashed treating the same disease which struck down Delta Goodrem

Cancer drug Keytruda price slashed treating the same disease which struck down Delta Goodrem . Please subscribe to not miss the latest video: https://goo.gl/mnweFW Agame-changing cancer drug will soon be available to sufferers of the same disease which struck down Delta Goodrem 15 years ago.Once costing hundreds of thousands of dollars, Keytruda will now be available to Australian patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma for as little as just $6.40.Hodgkin's is a type of leukemia where symptoms are often frighteningly similar to those of a common cold including fatigue, fever and the inability to fight infection.Promisingly, the disease is one of the most treatable cancers, with a survival rate of 85 per cent.In 2003, singing sensation Delta Goodrem was one of more than 600 young Australians adults diagnosed - the group most commonly affected by the illness.She responded well to treatment and was put into remission a year later.However, although many patients respond positively to a course of chemotherapy, those who don't were previously left with little other options.Now Keytruda, an immunotherapy drug, is finally within reach for all sufferers.Whereas it once cost up to $200,000 for a course of treatment, from now it will be available for just $39.50 a script.For those with a concession card, they can access it for a minuscule $6.40.The treatment helps the body use its own immune system to fight the cancer and is expected to help more than 120 Australians each year.Although Delta's battle with the disease was the most high profile, she is not the only young Australian celebrity to have battled Hodgkin's lymphoma.In 2013, aged just 23, former Home and Away actress Tessa James was also struck down by the illness.She also responded well to several rounds of chemotherapy and has since became an advocate hoping to raise awareness for the illness. .

Keytruda by Merck Side Effects

Keytruda by Merck Side Effects

~ one minute of side effect disclosure, solid.

New Cancer Drugs Come At A Steep Price

New Cancer Drugs Come At A Steep Price

Newer cancer drugs that enlist the body's immune system are improving the odds of survival, but competition between them is not reining in prices that can now top $250,000 a year. The drugs' success for patients is the result of big bets in cancer therapy made by big pharma. New drugs called checkpoint inhibitors work by releasing a molecular brake, allowing the immune system to recognize and attack cancer cells the same way it fights infections caused by bacteria or viruses. For cancers like melanoma, the treatments can mean long-term survival for around 20 percent of patients. Current checkpoint inhibitors each have a list price near $150,000 a year. A combination of drugs used for advanced or inoperable melanoma, has a cost of $256,000 a year for patients who respond to the treatment. The pharmaceutical industry holds that discussion of prescription drug prices has to take into account the major investment required for innovation and discovery of new lifesaving drugs. http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/reuters/topNews/~3/8zgJrpzhMlQ/us-usa-healthcare-cancer-costs-idUSKBN1750FU http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit Business using http://wochit.com

Would Pharmac fund Keytruda if it was cheaper?

Would Pharmac fund Keytruda if it was cheaper?

Pharmac chief executive Steffan Crausaz says the price of the melanoma drug Keytruda is one of the issues stopping the drug being publicly funded... but there are others. The Nation: Sat 9.30am/Sun 10am/Mon 11pm TV3 & Sat 7pm RadioLive. Or see us online at thenation.co.nz

La inmunoterapia contra el Cáncer - Pembrolizumab, tambien conocido como Keytruda

La inmunoterapia contra el Cáncer - Pembrolizumab, tambien conocido como Keytruda

Fuente:http://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2017/05/25/an-approval-like-no-other En el estudio, publicado en la revista Science, se le dio seguimiento a 86 pacientes que padecían cáncer de páncreas, próstata, útero y en los huesos en estadio avanzado. Los pacientes fueron tratados con Pembrolizuma, también conocido como Keytruda. Los resultados fueron muy prometedores: en 66 pacientes los tumores se redujeron significativamente y en 18 de ellos desaparecieron por completo y no han vuelto a reproducirse. Todos los pacientes compartían una mutación genética que impedía que sus células repararan el ADN dañado. Pembrolizumab es un bloqueador de la proteína PD -1; es decir, se trata de un fármaco emergente de inmunoterapia que ayuda al sistema inmunitario a encontrar las células cancerosas y atacar los tumores.

HHS Secretary on reducing drug prices through competition

HHS Secretary on reducing drug prices through competition

HHS Secretary Alex Azar on the Trump administration's efforts to reduce drug prices.

US BREAKING NEWS | Leading oncology group wary of Trump drug price proposals

US BREAKING NEWS | Leading oncology group wary of Trump drug price proposals

CHICAGO (Reuters) - A leading U.S. group of cancer doctors is wary of new Trump administration proposals for lowering drug prices, particularly if new negotiation tools are introduced that will mean the U.S. government no longer routinely pays for all cancer drugs in the Medicare health program for older people. The rising cost of cancer care will be in focus during an annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) that begins Friday in Chicago. In recent years, potent new immunotherapies and treatments that target genetic mutations underlying cancer have successfully curbed the disease in some patients. But they have come with ever-rising price tags, spurring new questions about how much individuals, corporations and the government in the United States, already the world’s most expensive health system, will pay for these breakthroughs. President Donald Trump last month unveiled a “blueprint” to reduce drug prices by promoting the entry of cheaper rivals to existing drugs and giving private insurers more scope to negotiate prices. In private health insurance plans, insurers have tools to negotiate prices on the drugs they cover for their members. In exchange for manufacturer discounts, insurers may lower the patient co-payment below competing treatments, or drop coverage of a rival drug altogether, to increase prescriptions. The Trump proposal includes the possibility that the government would stop covering all approved drugs for certain illnesses, including cancer, in the Medicare program. It has requested feedback from the industry on this and other ideas. “It is a balancing act, because we do think that there should be an ability to negotiate price, but we are always driven by our belief that patients should not be denied the most effective drugs for their condition,” ASCO’s chief executive officer, Dr. Clifford Hudis, told Reuters. Another idea is to change Medicare’s reimbursement of doctors including a fee calculated as a percentage of a drug’s price. Critics say the payments encourages physicians to use the most expensive drugs. Hudis said ASCO is not opposed to changing the formula, but argues that oncology practices will still need to be reimbursed for handling specialized cancer medicines delivered by infusion or injection. ASCO, the nation’s leading association of cancer physicians, said it will publicize its full response after submitting feedback to the Trump administration by a July 16 deadline. EFFECTIVENESS VS PRICE U.S. spending on cancer drugs reached almost $50 billion last year - nearly doubling since 2012 - and is projected to double again to $100 billion in five years, according to IQVIA, which collects drug sales data. Expensive new cancer treatments like Merck & Co’s $162,000-per-year immunotherapy Keytruda and Gilead Sciences Inc’s $373,000 blood cancer therapy Yescarta, which have helped some patients survive previously untreatable disease, are contributing to the increase. But so are less effective drugs without competitors whose prices are raised by manufacturers each year. Oncologists and other specialists benefit from price increases on drugs that are administered in their offices. Without percentage-based fees, oncology practices would lose “their ability to make considerable sums off their relationship with the pharmaceutical industry,” said Dr. Peter Bach, director of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Center for Health Policy Outcomes in New York. ASCO and other institutions have proposed their own methods for reducing healthcare costs, but stopped short of urging drugmakers to lower prices. ASCO has recommended ranking drugs on their comparative clinical value, including relative efficacy and side effects, but not price. The group has also suggested that the price of a cancer drug could vary depending on how effective it is for a specific indication, or how well an individual patient fares after the treatment. The association does not support moving to a flat fee for treating cancer patients, including drugs, an approach that is being used in other specialties. That “could force providers to make suboptimal or lower-value choices,” the organization said. At ASCO’s annual meeting, which runs from June 1-5, cancer researchers will prov ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Disclaimer The information on this channel is for information purposes only. The Youtupe Mania channel assume no liability for any inaccurate, delayed or incomplete information, nor for any actions taken in reliance thereon. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ SHARE AND SUBSCRIBE PLEASE, FOR UPDATING THANKS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- #usbreakingnews #breakingnews #LatestNews #newstoday #usatoday

How Does This Newly Approved Cancer Drug Treat Tumors Differently?

How Does This Newly Approved Cancer Drug Treat Tumors Differently?

On Tuesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that, for the first time, it had approved a cancer drug based on disease genetics rather than the body part where the cancer originated. The drug, called Keytruda, is targeted to what are called "mismatch repair genes," and its approval means it can be used to fight tumors with these genes wherever they appear -- in the colon, pancreas, stomach, ovaries or other body sites. Dr. Richard Pazdur, acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, told news outlets, "Until now, the FDA has approved cancer treatments based on where in the body the cancer started -- for example, lung or breast cancers. We have now approved a drug based on a tumor's biomarker without regard to the tumor's original location." http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2017/05/24/FDA-approves-cancer-drug-based-on-genetic-type-not-organ-of-origin/2391495644008/ http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com

Jimmy Carter No Longer Taking Cancer Treatments

Jimmy Carter No Longer Taking Cancer Treatments

Former president Jimmy Carter will be taking an immunotherapy drug that helps neutralize the cancer cells with the help of the immune system, so he will no longer be needing cancer treatment, according to Carter's spokesperson. President Carter has a skin cancer called melanoma that has been spreading to his brain and his liver. He made the medical announcement a few months ago from his nonprofit concern, "The Carter Center". Carter served as the president for one term, once elected as a democrat in 1976. After his presidency, Carter dedicated his life to diplomacy and the betterment of humanity. Carter was awarded the Nobel Peace prize in 2002. http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/Reuters/domesticNews/~3/nMqUMDjibOc/story01.htm http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com

Leading experts prescribe how to make cancer drugs more affordable

Leading experts prescribe how to make cancer drugs more affordable

A group of 118 of the nation's leading cancer experts have drafted a prescription for reducing the high cost of cancer drugs and voiced support for a patient-based grassroots movement demanding action on the issue. Their recommendations and support are outlined in a commentary, co-authored by the group, in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. "High cancer drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," says lead author Ayalew Tefferi, M.D., a hematologist at Mayo Clinic. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with cancer who needs a drug that costs $120,000 per year, the out-of-pocket expenses could be as much as $25,000 to $30,000 – more than half their average household income."

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