3 Genes That Give People Superpowers

3 Genes That Give People Superpowers

There are genetic mutations in the population today that can grant people some seemingly superhuman abilities. To get your 23andMe kit, go to: https://www.23andme.com/SciShow Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters—we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Kevin, Bealer, Mark Terrio-Cameron, KatieMarie Magnone, Patrick Merrithew, Charles Southerland, Fatima Iqbal, Sultan Alkhulaifi, Tim Curwick, Scott Satovsky Jr, Philippe von Bergen, Bella Nash, Bryce Daifuku, Chris Peters, Patrick D. Ashmore, Piya Shedden, Charles George ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: MSTN - stronger muscles https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/the-man-of-steel-myostatin-and-super-strength/ http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa040933#t=article https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/MSTN#normalfunction https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1498/ http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1984-82502012000300003 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1113/expphysiol.2012.065243/asset/eph1073.pdf?v=1&t=j1mbvm9e&s=cc218db59ef9337ad4c1baecfb2b099fc4bef4ed https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1698719/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3177043/ ACTN3 - fast-twitch muscles https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17289854 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/89 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26429734/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26148057 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0150594 https://www.wired.com/2008/11/the-actn3-sports-gene-test-what-can-it-really-tell-you/ http://muscle.ucsd.edu/musintro/fiber.shtml https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1180686/ http://jap.physiology.org/content/116/9/1197 LRP5 - stronger bones https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/LRP5#conditions http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa013444#t=article http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002929707605941 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S8756328205000165 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1359/jbmr.2003.18.6.960/full https://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Rs1815739 http://www.jbc.org/content/281/50/38276 http://oregonstate.edu/dept/biochem/hhmi/hhmiclasses/biochem/lectnoteskga/jan29.html http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0063323 ---------- Images: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MyostatinMutantWhippet.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Protein_ACTN3_PDB_1tjt.png https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:General_pathology;_from_the_11th_rev._German_ed._(1921)_(14578295997).jpg

Human Intelligence is the Result of Genetic Memory

Human Intelligence is the Result of Genetic Memory

Human Intelligence is the Result of Genetic Memory Genetic memory is a process in which a memory is passed down through the generations without the individual having to experience first-hand the topic of the memory. Genetic memory, simply put, is complex abilities and actual sophisticated knowledge inherited along with other more typical and commonly accepted physical and behavioral characteristics. In everyday terms, that means we get our intelligence, as well as our hair, skin and eye color from our families. In psychology, genetic memory is defined as a memory present at birth that exists in the absence of sensory experience, and is incorporated into the genome over long spans of time. In everyday terms, that means we remember things that we have never been exposed to, because it's been in our genes for so long. Genetic memories are defined as posited memories, feelings, and ideas inherited from our ancestors as part of a collective consciousness. These may be things like a natural fear of certain predators or insects, or things like a sense of taste, etc.. No one is sure yet just how much or what type of information is genetically passed from generation to generation. There are many theories concerning whether intellectual memory is inherited, and if so, how much. As modern man, we've managed to access genetic memory to some degree, but we still harbor such unbelievable potential. Intelligence, particularly the ability of genes to retain memory, has long been of primary interest to human genetic research. The first methodical set of experimental observations can be traced back to Galton’s work in 1865, a year before Mendel’s influential article on the laws of heredity. Using statistical tools, Galton evaluated the transmission of several traits in families. He concluded that many traits, including mental ability, are genetically transmitted and normally distributed in the general population. In 1881, Théodule Ribot held that psychological and genetic memory were based upon a common mechanism, and that the former only differed from the latter in that it interacted with consciousness. Brain scientists say that the size of certain regions of the brain are under tight genetic control, and that the larger these regions are, the higher the intelligence. The study of intelligence genetics examines how much, and by what manner, mental abilities are affected by genes. Many genetic and environmental factors influence intelligence, and the role Deoxyribonucleic acid plays in memory is one that science continues to struggle to understand. In the case of our ancestors, genetic intelligence has most certainly passed from generation to generation, though it was suppressed by the priority of survival for thousands of years. This is evidenced by the fact that the less time we began to spend on survival, the more advanced we became. Our intelligence is as natural to us as spots are to a cheetah, or stripes to a zebra. We are the only creatures that have ever existed on this planet who possess the power of creation. We not only create tools, we use them to make even more sophisticated tools, then adapt them for dozens of applications. Our intellectual development has exponentially increased in the last 100 years, and is estimated to grow by another 30% each year. To put that in perspective; a weekly edition of the New York Times today contains more information than the average person was likely to come across in an entire lifetime during seventeenth-century England. Will genetic memory lead to human extermination? Because we were placed on Earth to protect interstellar civilization from our negative behaviors, it is extremely probable that if we accomplish manned interstellar flight without first genetically and behaviorally altering ourselves in a positive way, we will bring about our imminent destruction. I assure you, our genetic and intellectual development has not just been of interest to us. Will genetic memory lead to human extermination? Possibly and probably. As we technologically approach the ability to permanently leave this planet, we remain constantly under intense observation by aliens.

Introduction to Quantitative Genetics by Bruce Walsh

Introduction to Quantitative Genetics by Bruce Walsh

Second Bangalore School on Population Genetics and Evolution URL: http://www.icts.res.in/program/popgen2016 DESCRIPTION: Just as evolution is central to our understanding of biology, population genetics theory provides the basic framework to comprehend evolutionary processes. Population genetics theory allows quantitative predictions of evolutionary processes, integrating mathematical and statistical concepts with fundamental biological principles of genetic inheritance and processes such as mutation and selection. Population genetics theory is thus critical to understanding many pressing issues in biology, such as the evolution of antibiotic resistance in pathogens, the formation of new species and the emergence of cooperative and altruistic behaviors. This school aims to expose students and researchers from diverse backgrounds to the basics and the forefront of current research in population genetics. Students from the disciplines of biology, mathematics, medicine, physics, and statistics who are interested in evolutionary theory are all welcome to apply for participation in this program. The school will introduce and develop an understanding of population genetics and quantitative genetics, and their applications. Research seminars and poster sessions will also be held during this school. ORGANIZERS: Deepa Agashe, Kavita Jain

Introduction to Data Science with R - Data Analysis Part 1

Introduction to Data Science with R - Data Analysis Part 1

Part 1 in a in-depth hands-on tutorial introducing the viewer to Data Science with R programming. The video provides end-to-end data science training, including data exploration, data wrangling, data analysis, data visualization, feature engineering, and machine learning. All source code from videos are available from GitHub. NOTE - The data for the competition has changed since this video series was started. You can find the applicable .CSVs in the GitHub repo. Blog: http://daveondata.com GitHub: https://github.com/EasyD/IntroToDataScience I do Data Science training as a Bootcamp: https://goo.gl/OhIHSc

John Ioannidis: The role of bias in nutritional research

John Ioannidis: The role of bias in nutritional research

John P.A. Ioannidis, C.F. Rehnborg Professor in Disease Prevention in the School of Medicine, and Professor, by Courtesy, of Statistics and Biomedical Data Science, Stanford University, presented "The role of bias in nutritional research" at the Swiss Re Institute's "Food for thought: The science and politics of nutrition" conference on 14 - 15 June 2018 in Rüschlikon. Find out more about the event: http://institute.swissre.com/events/food_for_thought_bmj.html

Why does Japan care so much about Blood Types?

Why does Japan care so much about Blood Types?

First 200 people to use this link https://brilliant.org/WIL/ can get 20% off an annual premium subscription to Brilliant! ▲Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/WILearned ▲Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeverettlearned One note for those interested: @4:27 -For type O's 「きかぬ氣の人」was translated as "inconsiderate," but persistent, stubborn, or more positively - "strong willed" would be more accurate. (似た言葉➡︎義強 意地張り 情っ張り 意固地 頑冥) -For type A's 「引込思案の人」was translated as "self absorbed," but it should be "shy" or "withdrawn." Literally "withdrawn thinking person". TRANSCRIPT with links and sources: https://www.patreon.com/posts/20461879 For Business inquiries: joseph.everett.wil@gmail.com

Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

John Oliver discusses how and why media outlets so often report untrue or incomplete information as science. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight

How to analyze RNA-Seq data? Find differentially expressed genes in your research.

How to analyze RNA-Seq data? Find differentially expressed genes in your research.

My RNA-Seq research is published: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-16603-y This is a class recording of VTPP 638 "Analysis of Genomic Signals" at Texas A&M University. No RNA-Seq background is needed, and it comes with a lot of free resources that help you learn how to do RNA-seq analysis. You will learn: (1) The basic concept of RNA-sequencing (2) How to design your experiment: library prep, sequencing depth, budgets, statistical power. (3) The analysis pipeline (4) Useful resources (all free!!!). ***Up-to-date RNA-Seq Analysis Training/Courses/Papers (Updated on Dec 2017) http://www.biostars.org/p/174376/ Other links are listed here: 1. Comparison of different Illumina Truseq RNA Prep kits: http://www.illumina.com/documents/products/datasheets/datasheet_truseq_stranded_rna.pdf 2. Scotty-Power analysis for RNA Seq Experiments: http://scotty.genetics.utah.edu/ 3. Illumina Sequencing Technology: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=womKfikWlxM 4. Ensembl FTP download website (include file format description): http://useast.ensembl.org/info/data/ftp/index.html 5. HISAT2: https://ccb.jhu.edu/software/hisat2/index.shtml 6. HTSeq: http://www-huber.embl.de/users/anders/HTSeq/doc/count.html 7. DESeq2 (click on "PDF" for manual): http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/DESeq2.html 8. How many biological replicates are needed in an RNA-seq experiment and which differential expression tool should you use? http://rnajournal.cshlp.org/content/22/6/839.long 9. Gene Ontology: http://pantherdb.org/ 10. IPA Webinars: https://www.qiagenbioinformatics.com/support/webinars/ 11. Texas A&M Supercomputing Facility-trainings: https://sc.tamu.edu/wiki/index.php/HPRC:Training 12. Command Line Tools for Genomic Data Science: https://www.coursera.org/learn/genomic-tools 13. Informatics for RNA-Seq Analysis 2016: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3izGL6oi0S849u7OZbX85WTyBxVdcpqx 14. http://www.rnaseq.wiki/ 15. Informatics for RNA Sequencing: A Web Resource for Analysis on the Cloud: http://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004393 16. A survey of best practices for RNA-seq data analysis: https://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-0881-8 17. RNA-Seq workflow: gene-level exploratory analysis and differential expression: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4670015/ 18. RNA-Seq Blog: http://www.rna-seqblog.com/ 19. BioStars: http://www.biostars.org/ 20. RNA-Seq Analysis Tutorial: https://github.com/CandiceChuDVM/RNA-Seq/wiki/RNA-Seq-analysis-tutorial

Intro to Structural Equation Modeling Using Stata

Intro to Structural Equation Modeling Using Stata

Chuck Huber, PhD with StataCorp presents on conducting statistical analyses using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) during the USC Interdisciplinary Speaker Series. Chuck Huber is a Senior Statistician at StataCorp and Adjunct Associate Professor of Biostatistics at Texas A&M. In addition to working with Stata's team of software developers, he produces instructional videos for the Stata Youtube channel, writes blog entries, develops online NetCourses and gives talks about Stata at conferences and universities. Most of his current work is focused on statistical methods used by psychologists and other behavioral scientists. Dr. Huber currently teaches introductory biostatistics and previously taught introductory biostatistics, categorical data analysis and statistical genetics at Texas A&M. He has published in the areas of neurology, human and animal genetics, alcohol and drug abuse prevention, nutrition and birth defects.

Item Response Models Using Stata

Item Response Models Using Stata

Chuck Huber, PhD with StataCorp presents on conducting statistical analyses using Bayesian Item Response Theory (IRT) during the USC Interdisciplinary Speaker Series. Chuck Huber is a Senior Statistician at StataCorp and Adjunct Associate Professor of Biostatistics at Texas A&M. In addition to working with Stata's team of software developers, he produces instructional videos for the Stata Youtube channel, writes blog entries, develops online NetCourses and gives talks about Stata at conferences and universities. Most of his current work is focused on statistical methods used by psychologists and other behavioral scientists. Dr. Huber currently teaches introductory biostatistics and previously taught introductory biostatistics, categorical data analysis and statistical genetics at Texas A&M. He has published in the areas of neurology, human and animal genetics, alcohol and drug abuse prevention, nutrition and birth defects.

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