Lobar Atelectasis on Frontal and Lateral Chest X-Rays [UndergroundMed]

Lobar Atelectasis on Frontal and Lateral Chest X-Rays [UndergroundMed]

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How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 9 - Atelectasis, Lines, Tubes, Devices, and Surgeries)

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 9 - Atelectasis, Lines, Tubes, Devices, and Surgeries)

A summary of how to identify atelectasis (including lobar collapse), identify various lines, tubes, and devices (including proper placement, and complications), and identification of prosthetic heart valves. Video includes the following images (among others): Juxtaphrenic peak, downloaded from Radiopaedia.org, originally posted by Gagandeep Singh RML collapse, downloaded from Radiopaedia.org, originally posted by Frank Gaillard LLL collapse, downloaded from Radiopaedia.org, originally posted by Yi-Jin Kuok Port, downloaded from Radiopaedia.org, originally posted by Henry Knipe ASD closure device, downloaded from Radiopaedia.org, originally posted by Jeremy Jones LVAD, downloaded from Radiopaedia.org, originally posted by Sajoscha Sorrentino Pacemaker perforation, downloaded from Radiopaedia.org, originally posted by Roberto Schubert Deep brain stimulator, downloaded from Radiopaedia.org, originally posted by Frank Gaillard Breast implants, downloaded from Radiopaedia.org, originally posted by Ian Bickle Sources for other images may include Wikimedia Commons, radiologypics.com, and Jose Caceres' wonderful radiology blog: Caceres Corner (http://blog.myesr.org/category/caceres-corner/)

Respiratory System - Chest Conditions- Atelectasis - Part 1

Respiratory System - Chest Conditions- Atelectasis - Part 1

Another video for radiographers, nurses, medical students and health professionals. Describes different types of atelectases.

chest x-ray, subsegmental atelectasis

chest x-ray, subsegmental atelectasis

Chest x-ray showing subsegmental atelectasis. Please visit my site www.academyofprofessionals.com for disclaimer.

Radiology of lung and lobar atelectasis

Radiology of lung and lobar atelectasis

Atelectasis

Atelectasis

Atelectasis (from Greek: ἀτελής, "incomplete" + ἔκτασις, "extension") is defined as the collapse or closure of the lung resulting in reduced or absent gas exchange. It may affect part or all of one lung. It is a condition where the alveoli are deflated, as distinct from pulmonary consolidation. It is a very common finding in chest x-rays and other radiological studies. It may be caused by normal exhalation or by several medical conditions. Although frequently described as a collapse of lung tissue, atelectasis is not synonymous with a pneumothorax, which is a more specific condition that features atelectasis. Acute atelectasis may occur as a post-operative complication or as a result of surfactant deficiency. In premature neonates, this leads to infant respiratory distress syndrome. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video

Left Upper Lobe Atelectasis on Chest X ray

Left Upper Lobe Atelectasis on Chest X ray

AP chest x-ray in a patient with shortness of breath demonstrates opacity along the left mediastinal border (arrows). There is also volume loss in the left hemithorax. This is a classic chest x-ray appearance of left upper lobe atelectasis. 2016PF24g

pleural effusion vs atelectasis

pleural effusion vs atelectasis

How to differentiate #pleural #effusion and #atelectasis

Atelectasis | Rapid Shallow and Difficulty Breathing

Atelectasis | Rapid Shallow and Difficulty Breathing

Atelectasis | Respiratory Tract Disorder

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 7 - Diffuse Lung Processes)

How to Interpret a Chest X-Ray (Lesson 7 - Diffuse Lung Processes)

An explanation of alveolar vs. interstitial opacities, including cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and the 3 types of interstitial patterns (reticular, nodular, and reticulonodular). Examples provided of air bronchograms, peribroncial cuffing, Kerley A and B lines, and cephalization. Etiologies of low lung volumes and hyperinflation are also discussed. Video includes the following image (among others): Cephalization, downloaded from Radiopaedia.org, originally posted by Charlie Chia-Tsong Hsu. Sources for other images may include Wikimedia Commons, radiologypics.com, and Jose Caceras' wonderful radiology blog: Caceres Corner (http://blog.myesr.org/category/caceres-corner/)

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