Anthony Bourdain on the worst mistake when cooking steak

Anthony Bourdain on the worst mistake when cooking steak

Chef and "Appetites" author Anthony Bourdain explains reveals the biggest mistake people make when cooking a steak. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/

Rib Eye Steak. How to cook/pan fry a thick steak at home.

Rib Eye Steak. How to cook/pan fry a thick steak at home.

Technic to cook a perfect thick steak at home in a pan.

Chef Robert Del Grande: How to Grill a Good Steak

Chef Robert Del Grande: How to Grill a Good Steak

RDG + Bar Annie | http://www.RDGBarAnnie.com Chef Robert Del Grande: How to Grill a Good Steak One of the most frequently asked questions is, "How do you grill a really good steak"? Chef Robert Del Grande answers this question in an informative video that can be applied to virtually any grilling scenario. If you would like Chef Robert to do the grilling for you, we welcome you to stop by RDG + Bar Annie anytime. RDG + Bar Annie 1800 Post Oak Boulevard Houston, TX 77056-3962 (713) 840-1111 http://www.RDGBarAnnie.com Video Produced by http://www.SkylineMovement.com

Why Parmesan Cheese Is So Expensive

Why Parmesan Cheese Is So Expensive

A wheel of parmesan cheese can cost over $1,000. A single wheel takes at least one year to age, 131 gallons of milk to make, and it can only be made in a restricted area in northern Italy, in the region of Emilia Romagna. We visited a dairy in Parma, Italy to find out how the cheese is made and why it is so expensive. ------------------------------------------------------ #ParmesanCheese #Italy #FoodInsider INSIDER is great journalism about what passionate people actually want to know. That’s everything from news to food, celebrity to science, politics to sports and all the rest. It’s smart. It’s fearless. It’s fun. We push the boundaries of digital storytelling. Our mission is to inform and inspire. Subscribe to our channel: http://insder.co/Food and visit us at: https://insder.co/2NCg6Sg FOOD INSIDER on Facebook: https://insder.co/2O4gt7A FOOD INSIDER on Instagram: http://insder.co/2aywJtk FOOD INSIDER on Twitter: https://insder.co/2IahHsi INSIDER on Snapchat: https://insder.co/2KJLtVo Why Parmesan Cheese Is So Expensive

How to grill the best New York Strip Steak of your LIFE!

How to grill the best New York Strip Steak of your LIFE!

Strip Steak Prep Time: 30 mins Cook Time: 12 mins Total Time: 42 mins Author: Susie Bulloch (heygrillhey.com) Ingredients 2 Strip Steaks Coarse Kosher or sea salt coarse ground black pepper Garlic Thyme Compound Butter (optional) 4 Tablespoons salted butter softened 2 cloves minced garlic 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves or 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves Instructions 30 minutes prior to grilling, remove your steaks from the refrigerator, season on both sides with the coarse salt and allow to come up in temperature. Preheat your grill to High heat. You're looking for temperatures around 900 degrees F on the grill grates. Combine all ingredients for the compound butter in a small bowl. Place one spoonful of butter directly on your serving platter underneath where each steak will be placed. Do this before you get your steaks on the grill so when they come off, you can set each steak on a spoonful of the butter. Set aside the remaining butter for the top of the grilled strip steaks. Place the steaks directly on the grill grates at a diagonal. For a medium rare steak, cook 2-3 minutes, then rotate 45 degrees and grill for 2-3 more minutes. Flip the steaks over, cook 2-3 minutes, then rotate 45 degrees and grill for 2-3 more minutes. Increase or decrease cooking time as needed to reach ideal internal doneness. For a rare steak, cook to 125 degrees F, Medium Rare to 135 degrees F, Medium to 145 degrees F, Medium Well 155 degrees F, Well Done to 160 degrees F. Remove the steaks from the grill and set each steak on the dollop of prepared compound butter. Let the steak rest for at least 8-10 minutes before slicing. Sprinkle with the black pepper just before serving.

Sean Evans Tries Some of NYC's Most Expensive Steaks with the Worth It Guys | Sean in the Wild

Sean Evans Tries Some of NYC's Most Expensive Steaks with the Worth It Guys | Sean in the Wild

Does it ever make sense to drop $162 on a hunk of beef? Steven Lim and Andrew Ilnyckyj—the hosts of BuzzFeed's hugely popular series, "Worth It"—help Sean Evans answer this age-old, New York steakhouse conundrum. Joined by Bowery Meat Company's Josh Capon (and of course cameraman Adam Bianchi...), the guys chew their way through a $148 T-bone Florentine, a $125 chateaubriand, and a $162 tomahawk ribeye. Find out which cut of meat is really worth maxing out that credit card on an all new episode of Sean in the Wild. Subscribe to First We Feast on YouTube: http://goo.gl/UxFzhK Check out more of First We Feast here: http://firstwefeast.com/ https://twitter.com/firstwefeast https://www.facebook.com/FirstWeFeast http://instagram.com/firstwefeast First We Feast videos offer an iconoclastic view into the culinary world, taking you behind-the-scenes with some of the country's best chefs and finding the unexpected places where food and pop culture intersect.

Why Is Caviar So Expensive?

Why Is Caviar So Expensive?

Caviar is one of the most expensive foods in the world. Selling for up to $35,000 per kilo, it's revered and relished by aristocrats across the globe. But it's an acquired taste. Turns out, caviar wasn't always so valuable. In the 19th century, sturgeon species in the US were so common that there are accounts of caviar being offered in saloons for free, like bar nuts. In Europe, fishermen were feeding the eggs to their pigs, or leaving it on the beach to spoil. What changed? Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: Similar to true champagne, caviar doesn't come from just anywhere. This, for example, is not caviar. To get the real thing, it has to be eggs from a sturgeon. There are 27 species around the world in North America, Europe, and Asia. But probably not for long.  Arne Ludwig: In this case, sturgeon will die out because humans are over-harvesting their populations and destroying their habitats. In 2010, the International Union for Conservation of Nature placed 18 species on its Red List of Threatened Species, making the sturgeon the most endangered group of species on Earth. But lists like these are bittersweet. On the one hand, they can help protect the sturgeon from further population decline. On the other hand, the rarer that caviar becomes, the more we can't get enough of it. There's actually an economic idea that explains this. It's called the rarity value thesis and it describes how "rarity increases the value of the item." Sturgeon can weigh up to several thousand pounds, and produce hundreds of pounds of roe at a time. The world record belongs to a beluga sturgeon that weighed 2,520 pounds and yielded 900 pounds of roe. Today, she'd be worth about half a million dollars.  It wasn't until around the 20th century when these freshwater fish and their eggs became a rare commodity. Pollution poisoned their waters and dams blocked their spawning grounds upstream. They had nowhere to reproduce and continued to be overfished for their meat and roe. On top of that, it takes 8-20 years for a female to sexually mature, depending on the species. She can produce millions of eggs at a time, but odds are that only one will survive to adulthood. In the end, the sturgeon population couldn't keep up with demand and their coveted eggs became the jewels of the luxury food scene. Today, caviar imports and exports are closely regulated in the US., which is partly why it's so expensive.  Deborah Keane: People forget that every single egg, every one of these eggs is taken off by hand. Now, remember that we're dealing with a raw seafood endangered species. So it is basically like eating and dealing with edible elephant tusks. It is that heavily regulated. That's why today, the majority of caviar comes from sturgeon farms. Deborah Keane: Little did I know that by 2011, all wild caviar would become illegal on the planet. When I started there were six farms in the world and only two producing caviar in the world and that was in 2004. Now, there are 2,000 farms. One farm, in particular, in China called Kaluga Queen produces 35% of the world's caviar. Caviar there is harvested with the classic Russian and Iranian technique, which involves killing the fish and then extracting the eggs. Other farms are exploring a different technique, which doesn't involve killing the fish. It's called stripping. The fish are injected with a hormone that triggers their urge to release eggs. Farmers have been doing this for many years, but not to get caviar — just to produce more fish. It wasn't until recently that people started canning this stuff and selling it as caviar. Dmitrijs Tracuks: The biggest thing is that yes, fish stays alive. You have really small impact on the fish because you do it really fast. You take the fish out of the water, you put it on the special holding facility. The fish has already started to spawn and so all that requires is to press on the belly, massage the belly and the caviar will just flow out of the fish. The idea behind no-kill caviar is a commendable one, but it has yet to catch on. Either way, with caviar farms in place, this gives the wild sturgeon population a chance to recover. But whether or not, that happens is largely up to us.: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/

CHRISTMAS RECIPE: Roasted Turkey With Lemon Parsley & Garlic | Gordon Ramsay

CHRISTMAS RECIPE: Roasted Turkey With Lemon Parsley & Garlic | Gordon Ramsay

Gordon Ramsay demonstrated how to perfect roasting a turkey. Gordon Ramsay’s Ultimate Cookery Course – http://amzn.to/2BzAud5 Subscribe for weekly cooking videos. If you liked this clip check out the rest of Gordon's channels: http://www.youtube.com/gordonramsay http://www.youtube.com/kitchennightmares http://www.youtube.com/thefword

Tips & Tricks #1 - Poor Man's Filet Mignon

Tips & Tricks #1 - Poor Man's Filet Mignon

Jack Scalfani shows you how to make a cheap steak taste delicious. Be sure to subscribe to this channel and Jack's new channel "Jack on the Go" http://youtube.com/jackonthego steps for tenderizing: -- coat entire top of steak with coarse salt. -- leave sitting out on counter for 1 hour per inch of meat -- completely wash off salt. Pat dry the meat with a paper towel -- cook and season as you normally would. Don't add any type of salt while cooking. Not garlic salt, onion salt or regular salt. Enjoy!

Anthony Bourdain's 3 tips to a perfect burger

Anthony Bourdain's 3 tips to a perfect burger

Chef and "Appetites" author Anthony Bourdain explains what goes into the perfect burger and when to add additional toppings. Read more: http://www.techinsider.io/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TWITTER: https://twitter.com/businessinsider INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/

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